Asthma phenotypes in children

04.09.2019 0 By ADMIN

Although the term “phenotype” was proposed as early as the beginning of the 20th centurythe process of identifying asthma phenotypes and creating classification criteria for asthma on this basis was not entirely straightforward.
Asthma phenotypes in children

Problems of pathophysiological heterogeneity and clinical diversity of various forms of bronchial asthma (BAhave been actively developed by domestic scientists and are reflected to a greater or lesser extent in various classificationsand the current stage of BA study is marked by the inclusion of the concept of heterogeneity directly in the definition of the disease: “Asthma is a heterogeneous diseaseis characterizedas a ruleby chronic inflammation of the respiratory tract.

Phenotyping of the disease and associated endotyping becomes a key factor in the choice of the optimal therapy for asthmaallows to provide a differentiated approach to treatmentdevelopment of individual therapy schemes for the disease and effective algorithms for the use of drugs.

The phenotype (from the Greek word phainotip – I showI findis considered as a set of characteristics inherent in an individual at a certain stage of developmenta kind of “removal” of genetic information towards environmental factorsthese are clinically observed patternsclinical and morphological findingsand a response to treatmentA phenotype is formed on the basis of a genotype mediated by a number of external environmental factorswhich is what we see and may be able to changeThe endotype describes the key pathogenetic mechanisms for a particular asthma phenotype.

Age is one of the main factors that form the asthma phenotype and includes pathophysiological eventsexposure of allergens and triggersand changes in the natural course of the diseaseImportant aspects of heterogeneity of childhood asthma and its course in different age groups have been reflected in modern clinical guidelines.

Age periodization in clinical guidelines for children’s asthma is based on the peculiarities of the disease and is based on practical conveniencewith the following age groups being distinguishedinfants (02 years old), preschool children (35 years old), schoolchildren (612 years old), adolescentsIt should be noted that there is no official international definition of the exact age for adolescentsThe term “adolescents” is not mentioned in international conventionsbut the United Nations recognizes adolescents as persons aged 10 to 19i.ethose whose age is limited to the second decade of lifeModern science defines adolescence by countryregionculture and nationalityand sex (1012 to 1718 years). The majority of works on age grouping indicate that the teenage age of boys lasts from 13 to 16 yearsand of girls – from 12 to 15 yearsthe younger teenage age is 1113 yearsthe older teenage age is 1415 yearsas well as the teenage age from 17 to 21 years for boys and from 16 to 20 years for girlsi.ethe time limits of the teenage age (1721 yearsare also differentiated by sexGirls and girls enter these periods of development a year earlier and complete them earlierThis is due to the impact of gender on the intensity of growth and developmentEach of these periods of development has its own characteristicsThe proposed age periodization is based on the biological principlethis period covers the period from the beginning of puberty to the moment when the young body acquires the ability to effectively reproduce (transitionor puberty).

The development of perceptions of the changing characteristics of asthma in different age periods is reflected in the harmonized report of the Association of Allergists Practitioners (PRACTALL). The document notes that different BA phenotypes can be determined based on the age of the child and the triggering factors of the diseaseRecognition of these different phenotypes and severity of the disease can help to better evaluate prognosis and therapy strategies [6]. The approach to the determination of AD phenotypes in children over 2 years of ageas outlined in the harmonized reportis illustrated in Figure 6The predominance of a particular phenotype is useful for solving diagnosis and treatment problemsbut the phenotypes can be combined to produce overlapping phenomena.

The principles of differentiation of bronchial asthma phenotypes according to these guidelines apply to preschool and schoolage children and include a virusesinduced phenotypeexercise induced asthmaallergic (allergeninducedasthma phenotypeand bronchial asthma of unknown etiologyThe most frequent and visible phenotype among older children is allergic (atopicbronchial asthmaThe absence of a specific allergic trigger may indicate a phenotype of nonallergic bronchial asthmaHoweverclinicians should be cautious about the likelihood of this phenotypeas failure to identify an allergic trigger phenomenon may only be an indication that it has not been detected.

Asthma phenotyping problems in adolescents have long been the focus of attentionbut so far there is no complete understanding of the formation and stability of phenotypesespecially in the absence of longitudinal studiesThere are no stated distinctive features of phenotypes in terms of severity or duration of the diseaseThe phenotype covers the clinically significant properties of the diseasebut does not necessarily relate these characteristics to the etiology and pathophysiology of the disease.

Phenotypes of AD differ in severitytreatment efficacyrisk of adverse outcomesrisk of progressive loss of lung function and formation of irreversible bronchial obstructionThe notion of asthma as a single disease is becoming a thing of the pastand more and more researchers see asthma as a clinical syndrome that requires not only phenotypic detailbut also an analysis of age dynamicsassessment of evolutionand prognosis of disease progression.