Bronchial asthma

28.08.2019 0 By ADMIN

Bronchial asthma (BAis one of the most common diseases in the worldThis pathology affects 5of the world’s populationwith twothirds of patients with AD having nighttime bronchospasm attackswhich significantly worsens the quality of sleep andas a resultincreases the severity of the disease . These nighttime attacks are commonly referred to as nighttime asthmaIt is characterized by a significant decrease in the daily rhythm of bronchial permeability during the night’s sleepNaturallyeffective nighttime care is very difficult.

The first mention of asthma at night dates back to the 17th centuryAs early as 1698DrJohn Floyeran asthmatic himselfwrote: “I noticed that the attack always occurs at night… At the first waking uparound 1 or 2 a.m., the attack of asthma becomes more obviousbreathing slows down…, the diaphragm seems to be hard and squeezed… It can be very difficult to go down“. Despite such a clear descriptionit took at least two and a half centuries for asthma to receive more attention at nightThere was a dispute between specialists about whether the number of deaths among people with AD increased at night or notThe published joint results of four studies showed that 93 out of 219 deaths occurred between midnight and 8 a.m., which in itself indicates a significant (P0.01increase in the number of deaths at night . Of coursethe mortality rate is higher at night than in the rest of the populationbut it is only a 5increase in the number of deaths between midnight and 8 a.m., as opposed to a 28increase in the same rate among asthmatic patients . Eight out of ten cases of respiratory arrest in asthmatic patients – already in hospital – also occurred in the early morning .

The accelerated volume of exhaled air (forced expiratory volumein 1 second (PEOand pycfluometry in asthma patients fall sharply during the nightwith the majority of patients more than 50%. Among patients in remissionapproximately one third have bronchospasm only at nightand another third have it before bedtime and continue throughout the nightThustwo thirds of these patients have the lowest bronchial passability between 10 p.mand 8 a.m..

Most healthy people also experience daily changes in bronchial caliber with nighttime bronchospasmA significant number of studies comparing the daily changes in bronchial permeability in healthy subjects and unstable asthmatic patients showed thatalthough the changes in asthmatics and healthy subjects are indeed synchronousthe amplitude of the decrease in bronchial permeability in patients with bronchial asthma is significantly higher (50%) than in healthy subjects (8%).

Lack of sleep during the night reduces the degree of nightly narrowing of the respiratory tractThe fact that some narrowing of the airway during the night may persisteven if the patient is awake all night (e.g., during shift work), may be due to changes in the daily rhythms of each individual.

Thusa nighttime bronchospasm in asthma appears to exceed the normal level of daily changes in bronchial caliberIt is a consequence of hypersensitivity to factors causing mild nighttime bronchospasm in healthy subjects.

Possiblealbeit less likelycauses of airway constriction at night include the position of the body during sleepinterruption of treatmentand the presence of allergens in beddingOn the other handthe position of the body probably does not affect the width of the bronchial lumenat least because patients who are in bed around the clock continue to have bronchospasm attacksmainly at nightThe length of time between medication is also not fundamentalregular use of bronchodilators during the day does not lead to the disappearance of nighttime bronchospasmand nighttime breathing difficulties are still the subject of complaints from many untreated asthma patientsIt is also unlikely that the presence of allergens in bedding is the primary cause of nighttime asthmaas their removalcontrary to expectationsdoes not contribute to the elimination of nighttime bronchospasmHoweverit is likely that exposure to domestic allergens increases the degree of bronchial reactivity in patients with a corresponding predisposition and may thus lead to nighttime bronchospasm.

Bronchospasm in asthma patients may also be caused by cold and dry airNighttime asthma is expected to be associated with inhaling cooler air at night or cooling the bronchial wall as a result of a decrease in body surface temperature during the nightIt is unlikely that the temperature and humidity of the inhaled air will play a fundamental rolesince during the night bronchospasm is persistent even in healthy subjectswhen the temperature and humidity of the air are maintained at a constant level during the dayHoweverone study showed that inhaling warmer and wetter (3637C100humidityair during the night compared to room air (23C1724humidityresulted in the disappearance of nighttime bronchospasm in six of the seven asthma patients who participated in the studyHoweverthis studyfirstlywas not numerousand secondlyit was conducted without polysomnographic controlso it remains unclear how well these patients slept.

The main complaint of patients with nighttime asthma attacks is that their sleep is impaired and they often feel tired and sleepy during the dayThis type of sleep disturbance has been confirmed by studies conducted in the EEC countriesNightly bronchospasm attacks are an indicator of the severity of ADso the diagnosis of such conditions is necessaryfor which it is recommended to clarify the daily rhythm of the onset of asphyxiation attacksthe number of wakeups during the nightthe nature and quality of sleepTo this endpatients with ADespecially those with signs of nighttime asthmaundergo a polysomnographic studyIn the course of this studyin real timeduring the night’s sleep of the patientcarry out a onestage registration of EEG channels (leads C3 / A2 and C4 / A1), EEG of the left and right eyesEMG from the chin musclesthe sensor of air flow breathingSensors of thoracic and abdominal respiratory forcemicrophone reading (snoringand body position sensor readingECG (precardial leads); pulse and blood oxygen saturation (SaO2recordingIn additionobstructive sleep apnea syndrome (respiratory arrest with complete cessation of airflow in the respiratory tract for at least 10 secondscan be detected in patients during a polysomnographic examinationwhich further aggravates the course of bronchial asthma.

Several groups of researchers have recorded electroencephalogram (EEGreadings of patients with asthma in sleepwith attention paid to the stage of sleepduring which patients woke up with asthma attacksThe largest of these studies revealed that asthma attacks occur at all stages of sleep with a frequency proportional to the sum of time spent in each stage of sleepThis studyconducted using a sleep laboratorywoke up asthmatic patients for two nights during the dreaming phase of sleep (REMsleepor during lowwave sleep (NREMsleep), followed by picfluometryThe results showed that the pycfluometry data were lower when awakened from REM sleep than from NREM sleepHoweverthe difference between these figures averaged only 200 mlwhile the fall of PEEE overnight was about 800 mlExhalation time during bronchospasm should have increasedand it was initially thought that asthma patients had asthma that increased during REM sleepFurther studies have shown that there is no change in the mean pycfluometric values between the individual stages of sleep in generalbut that the duration of exhalation is noticeably more variable during REM sleepwhich corresponds to the general irregularity of frequency and depth of breathing at this stageAs with healthy subjectsasthma patients have reduced ventilation as they move from waking to different stages of sleepthe ventilation level becomes lower during NREM sleep compared to waking and the lowest levels are recorded during REM sleepIn additionrecent studies have shown that nighttime asthma leads to oxygen desaturation during sleep and therefore to chronic hypoxemia.